compressive stress

Solution to Problem 270 Thermal Stress

Problem 270
A bronze sleeve is slipped over a steel bolt and held in place by a nut that is turned to produce an initial stress of 2000 psi in the bronze. For the steel bolt, A = 0.75 in2, E = 29 × 106 psi, and α = 6.5 × 10-6 in/(in·°F). For the bronze sleeve, A = 1.5 in2, E = 12 × 106 psi and α = 10.5 × 10-6 in/(in·°F). After a temperature rise of 100°F, find the final stress in each material.
 

Solution to Problem 265 Thermal Stress

Problem 265
A bronze bar 3 m long with a cross sectional area of 320 mm2 is placed between two rigid walls as shown in Fig. P-265. At a temperature of -20°C, the gap Δ = 2.5 mm. Find the temperature at which the compressive stress in the bar will be 35 MPa. Use α = 18.0 × 10-6 m/(m·°C) and E = 80 GPa.
 

Figure P-265

 

Solution to Problem 250 Statically Indeterminate

Problem 250
In the assembly of the bronze tube and steel bolt shown in Fig. P-250, the pitch of the bolt thread is p = 1/32 in.; the cross-sectional area of the bronze tube is 1.5 in.2 and of steel bolt is 3/4 in.2 The nut is turned until there is a compressive stress of 4000 psi in the bronze tube. Find the stresses if the nut is given one additional turn. How many turns of the nut will reduce these stresses to zero? Use Ebr = 12 × 106 psi and Est = 29 × 106 psi.
 

Figure P-250

 

Solution to Problem 233 Statically Indeterminate

Problem 233
A steel bar 50 mm in diameter and 2 m long is surrounded by a shell of a cast iron 5 mm thick. Compute the load that will compress the combined bar a total of 0.8 mm in the length of 2 m. For steel, E = 200 GPa, and for cast iron, E = 100 GPa.
 

Solution to Problem 131 Bearing Stress

Problem 131
Repeat Problem 130 if the rivet diameter is 22 mm and all other data remain unchanged.
 

Solution to Problem 130 Bearing Stress

Problem 130
Figure P-130 shows a roof truss and the detail of the riveted connection at joint B. Using allowable stresses of τ = 70 MPa and σb= 140 MPa, how many 19-mm-diameter rivets are required to fasten member BC to the gusset plate? Member BE? What is the largest average tensile or compressive stress in BC and BE?
 

130-simple-truss.gif

 

Solution to Problem 123 Shear Stress

Problem 123
A rectangular piece of wood, 50 mm by 100 mm in cross section, is used as a compression block shown in Fig. P-123. Determine the axial force P that can be safely applied to the block if the compressive stress in wood is limited to 20 MN/m2 and the shearing stress parallel to the grain is limited to 5MN/m2. The grain makes an angle of 20° with the horizontal, as shown. (Hint: Use the results in Problem 122.)
 

Solution to Problem 116 Shear Stress

Problem 116
As in Fig. 1-11c, a hole is to be punched out of a plate having a shearing strength of 40 ksi. The compressive stress in the punch is limited to 50 ksi. (a) Compute the maximum thickness of plate in which a hole 2.5 inches in diameter can be punched. (b) If the plate is 0.25 inch thick, determine the diameter of the smallest hole that can be punched.
 

116-hole-puncher.gif

 

Solution to Problem 113 Normal Stress

Problem 113
Find the stresses in members BC, BD, and CF for the truss shown in Fig. P-113. Indicate the tension or compression. The cross sectional area of each member is 1600 mm2.
 

Solution to Problem 112 Normal Stress

Problem 112
Determine the cross-sectional areas of members AG, BC, and CE for the truss shown in Fig. P-112. The stresses are not to exceed 20 ksi in tension and 14 ksi in compression. A reduced stress in compression is specified to reduce the danger of buckling.
 

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